Vaccines

Canine Vaccines

What better way to help your dog live a long and healthy life than to protect him or her today from future disease? Vaccination protects your dog from many common infectious diseases - which can be serious or even fatal. Vaccination enhances your dogs quality of life. In addition, some infectious diseases, like rabies can also affect people, so vaccinating your dog also helps protect you and your family.

Canine Vaccines

Canine Distemper
Distemper is a very serious viral disease that causes symptoms such as fever, loss of appetite, diarrhea, nasal discharge, skin disease, and even seizures. The virus can become airborne and enter the body through the nose or mouth or it can spread by direct dog-to-dog contact. Dogs who survive a distemper infection can have lifelong complications. Fortunately, a vaccine is available and part of routine vaccination protocols.

Canine Adenovirus (Hepatitis)
Depending on which adenovirus a dog is infected with, the complications can vary from mild flu-like symptoms from which they will recover with supportive therapy, to serious liver disease. A vaccine has been developed to protect against both Type-1 and Type-2 adenovirus.

Canine Parainfluenza
Another common vaccine your dog may receive is for parainfluenza, a highly contagious disease which results in upper respiratory infections. This virus does not generally cause severe disease. However, it can make your dog more susceptible to secondary bacterial and viral infections which can ultimately lead to more severe implications.

Canine Parvovirus
Typically, parvovirus attacks the lining of the small intestine and leads to anorexia, severe vomiting and diarrhea, which can sometimes be bloody. Another form of parvo-viral infection in very young puppies can lead to damage to the heart and sudden death. Primarily, the virus is spread through contact with or ingestion of an infected animals feces. But it can also be spread by contact with contaminated animals, insects, or objects. Puppies 6 weeks to 6 months old are most commonly affected, though any age of unprotected dog can infected. Vaccination is important because even with aggressive treatment parvovirus is often fatal.

Rabies
Rabies is an infectious disease caused by a virus that attacks the nervous system. Following a bite from an infected animal, the disease develops slowly over days to moths. In Canada, wildlife such as raccoons, skunks, foxes, and bats pose an ongoing risk of rabies. Because of the potential risk to humans, rabies vaccination is required by law in most jurisdictions. In unvaccinated dogs, rabies is fatal.

Canine Leptospirosis
Leptospirosis is currently a growing concern in Canada. it is a serious infectious disease of both animals and people caused by Leptospira bacteria. The early stages of leptospirosis appear as flu-like symptoms which can be easily confused with other diseases. If not detected early in the course of disease, the bacteria can damage the liver and kidneys and potentially be fatal. Puddles, ditches, ad slow moving streams are all environments that can harbour Leptospira and can indirectly infect your dog. Ask your veterinarian about the risks to your dog and if a vaccination is appropriate.

Canine Cough (Bordetella)
Canine Cough (a highly contagious disease that is commonly caused by Bordetella Bronciseptica bacteria) is transmitted through close contact with infected dogs. For this reason, the dogs at greatest risk of contracting canine cough include those who visit dog parks, daycares, kennels, training classes, shows, et. Two forms of the vaccine are available - intra-nasal or injectable. Ask your veterinarian for more information.

Feline Vaccines

What better way to help your cat live a long and healthy life than to protect him or her today from future disease? Vaccination protects your cat from many common infectious diseases - which can be serious or even fatal. Vaccination enhances your cats quality of life. In addition, some infectious diseases, like rabies can also affect people, so vaccinating your cat also helps protect you and your family.

Feline Vaccines

Feline Upper Respiratory Disease
While feline upper respiratory disease can be complicated by bacterial infections such as Chlamydiosis, it is primarily caused by two viruses - feline Rhinotracheitis virus and feline Calicivirus. These viruses are highly contagious and are easily transmitted by close contact with an infected cat. Infected cats can have flu like symptoms: fever, runny nose and eye infections, or oral ulcers. A vaccine is available, and typically included as part of your cat's routine protocol.

Feline Panleukopenia
Feine Panleukopenia is caused by a parvovirus. This virus is very contagious, which is particularly concerning since it can remain stable in the environment for long periods of time. The symptoms Panleukopenia include sudden onset of severe vomiting and diarrhea. A vaccine is available for this often fatal disease, and included as part of your cat's routine protocol.

Feline Leukemia
Feline Leukemia is a viral condition that attacks a cat's immune system and leaves the vulnerable to many other secondary infections. The virus is shed in the saliva, urine and feces of an infected cat. Rsk exposure is therefore highest for cats that go outdoors and those that have direct contact with infected cats. Although many cats that become infected can live for many years, most will succumb to leukemia-associated diseases. Discuss with your veterinarian if your cat should be vaccinated for this disease.

Rabies
Rabies is an infectious disease caused by a virus that attacks the nervous system. Following a bite from an infected animal, the disease develops slowly over days to moths. In Canada, wildlife such as raccoons, skunks, foxes, and bats pose an ongoing risk of rabies. Because of the potential risk to humans, rabies vaccination is required by law in most jurisdictions. In unvaccinated cats, rabies is fatal.